Have a history question? We answer those. We can also answer questions about philosophy, guns, cars, art and ourselves, but you probably don't care about that last one.

You can read about our adventures here!
Here’s a basic timeline for you, since there are so many answers to this question that could technically be considered correct:
1828: Anyos Jedlik creates an electromagnetic motor with a stator, rotor and commutator. He uses it to power a tiny model car. Some people consider this to be the first electric car even though you couldn’t drive it or anything.
1834: Thomas Davenport creates the first American DC electric motor, then uses it to power a small car around a track. This set the stage for streetcars to eventually run on electricity. Again, some people consider this the first electric car, but it wasn’t exactly something you could travel with.
1835: Sibrandus Stratingh and Christopher Becker create a car that runs on non-rechargeable primary cells. This is also on a small scale, so it’s a model, too. (Clyde gave me this one since these two are Dutch.)
1838: Robert Davidson builds an electric locomotive. It can travel at 4 mph. FAST.
Somewhere between 1832-1839: Robert Anderson builds a sort of electric carriage thingy. We’re not exactly sure when he did it.
1867: An electric motorcycle goes on display at the World Exhibition (in Paris). To this day, the French still like bicycles and motorcycles and stuff. 
1881: Gustave Trouve shows off a working three-wheel car at the International Electricity Exhibition of Paris. 
There you go! An Englishman named Thomas Parker claimed that he had created a working electric car by 1884, but Trouve’s three-wheeler beat it by three years.
Obviously, we’ve come a long way with these electric vehicles. They’re seen as a mainstream thing these days after years of not being seen as a viable option, which is interesting - my racing teammate Armo is even trying to design a racecar that runs solely on electricity. He might just figure that out, actually.
By the way, my all-time favorite electric car? The Hammerhead Eagle i-Thrust and its immediate predecessor Geoff.
~ Ells, who really wishes someone would pay her to write about automotive history

Here’s a basic timeline for you, since there are so many answers to this question that could technically be considered correct:

  • 1828: Anyos Jedlik creates an electromagnetic motor with a stator, rotor and commutator. He uses it to power a tiny model car. Some people consider this to be the first electric car even though you couldn’t drive it or anything.
  • 1834: Thomas Davenport creates the first American DC electric motor, then uses it to power a small car around a track. This set the stage for streetcars to eventually run on electricity. Again, some people consider this the first electric car, but it wasn’t exactly something you could travel with.
  • 1835: Sibrandus Stratingh and Christopher Becker create a car that runs on non-rechargeable primary cells. This is also on a small scale, so it’s a model, too. (Clyde gave me this one since these two are Dutch.)
  • 1838: Robert Davidson builds an electric locomotive. It can travel at 4 mph. FAST.
  • Somewhere between 1832-1839: Robert Anderson builds a sort of electric carriage thingy. We’re not exactly sure when he did it.
  • 1867: An electric motorcycle goes on display at the World Exhibition (in Paris). To this day, the French still like bicycles and motorcycles and stuff.
  • 1881: Gustave Trouve shows off a working three-wheel car at the International Electricity Exhibition of Paris.

There you go! An Englishman named Thomas Parker claimed that he had created a working electric car by 1884, but Trouve’s three-wheeler beat it by three years.

Obviously, we’ve come a long way with these electric vehicles. They’re seen as a mainstream thing these days after years of not being seen as a viable option, which is interesting - my racing teammate Armo is even trying to design a racecar that runs solely on electricity. He might just figure that out, actually.

By the way, my all-time favorite electric car? The Hammerhead Eagle i-Thrust and its immediate predecessor Geoff.

~ Ells, who really wishes someone would pay her to write about automotive history